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Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By Gilbert Dental Care
April 11, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: teeth whitening  

Is it inevitable that your smile will yellow with time? Not so with teeth whitening from Gilbert Dental Care in Philadelphia! After a careful oral teeth whiteningexamination, Dr. Steve Gilbert and Dr. Carlos Velez can restore that youthful sheen and brightness! Read on to learn if you, too, could be a candidate for this popular aesthetic service!

 

FAQs about teeth whitening

Why should I go to the dentist for teeth whitening?

Your Philadelphia dentist will assure you that teeth whitening is safe for you, your teeth, and your gums. People with active decay, multiple restorations (e.g. fillings), and untreated gum disease will generally not be good candidates. Also, individuals who are pregnant, lactating, or under active treatment for a serious health condition, such as cancer, should postpone teeth whitening.

 

What stains tooth enamel?

Experts at the Tufts School of Dental Medicine state that tooth enamel retains pigmentation from food such as blackberries, black tea, colas, coffee, and soy sauce. Also, acidic foods, such as citrus fruits and tomatoes, actually make tooth enamel softer, more porous, and more apt to stain. Tobacco is one of the biggest stainers.

 

Is teeth whitening a long process?'

No, teeth whitening takes just one hour at our Philadelphia office. The at-home type takes about a week of daily gel applications.

 

What is the active ingredient in whitening gel?

Usually, it's hydrogen peroxide, which bleaches out organic matter stuck in the enamel matrix. At-home whitening utilizes custom-fit acrylic trays filled with the gel, and in the office, the dentist "paints" on the peroxide gel and then rinses it off.

 

Will my teeth and gums hurt afterward?

Sometimes whitening leaves a bit of residual sensitivity behind. However, it is a mild sensation that will go away shortly.

 

Will my teeth remain white?

If you stay away from dark foods and beverages and tobacco, your teeth will stay bright for a long time. Remember to also brush twice a day as the American Dental Association advises, and floss your teeth at least once daily. See Dr. Gilbert or Dr. Velez for an exam and cleaning twice a year and for an occasional whitening touch-up as needed.

 

A fabulous smile

Improve your once-drab smile by as much as eight shades with professional, safe, and effective teeth whitening from Gilbert Dental Care. Call us today to arrange your whitening consultation: (215) 972-0406.

DentalImplantscanReplaceYourWholeToothNotJustWhatYouSee

If you've lost a tooth or need to have one extracted, you have to decide how to replace it. Of all the options available none can match both the lifelikeness and function of a dental implant.

A dental implant is a prosthetic (false) tooth that mimics the root of a natural tooth. Once that implant root form fuses to the surrounding bone, we attach the crown, which is the part of the tooth you can see.

While other replacement options like bridges or dentures can restore the lifelikeness of the tooth crown, they don't replace the root. An implant's titanium post can: using a minor surgical procedure we imbed the post into the bone. Because bone cells have a natural affinity with titanium, they will grow around and adhere to the post over a few weeks after surgery. This further adds strength to the implant's hold in the bone.

Although the attachment isn't exactly like natural teeth, it can maintain this hold for many years. And because it encourages bone growth, a dental implant will help minimize bone loss, a natural consequence of losing teeth. Other replacement options can't do that.

Of course, implants are more costly than other restorations. With an attached crown, an implant can replace any number of teeth. But if you have extensive tooth loss, bridges or dentures would be more cost-effective selections.

But even then, implants could still play a role. We can strategically place a small number of implants as supports for a bridge or even a removable denture. Not only will the implants better secure their attachment, they'll also stimulate bone growth.

Is a dental implant the right choice for you? Visit us for a complete examination and evaluation. Afterward we can discuss your options and whether this phenomenal tooth restoration method could help restore your smile.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Best Option for Replacing Teeth.”

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If you’re in the initial planning stages for a dental implant, you may already be encountering a number of options to consider. One that may come up is how the visible crown will attach to the metal implant imbedded in the bone.

Generally speaking, implants are composed of two parts: a metal post most often made of titanium placed into the bone that serves as the “root” for the new tooth; and a visible, life-like crown made of dental porcelain that attaches to an abutment on the titanium post. The crown can be attached in one of two ways: either with a small screw through the biting surface of the crown into a receiving hole in the abutment or cemented to it.

The major advantage of a screwed crown is that it allows for easy removal of the crown if needed. While the titanium post can often last a lifetime, porcelain crowns more often need repair or replacement since they receive the brunt of the biting forces in the mouth. A screw-attached crown is much easier to remove than a cemented one.

On the other hand, screwed crowns have a small access hole that must be restored with a tooth-colored filling to help the crown appear natural. This isn’t too great an issue with back teeth but does make achieving a natural appearance in the front more difficult. Cemented crowns look more like a natural tooth and are thus more flexible in achieving the desired appearance.

Besides the possibility the cement may cause gum inflammation or bone loss, the chief detraction from cemented crowns is the difficulty in removing them. Crowns are often damaged in this process so it’s highly likely it will have to be replaced rather than repaired. It’s possible to use weaker cement, but this raises the risk of the crown coming loose at some point from the abutment.

As we plan for your implant, we’ll discuss which type of attachment will work best for you, depending on the tooth to be replaced and other conditions with your oral health. The end result, though, should be the same — a new, natural-looking tooth that serves you well for many years to come.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Crowns Attach to Implants.”

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While the sport of golf may not look too dangerous from the sidelines, players know it can sometimes lead to mishaps. There are accidents involving golf carts and clubs, painful muscle and back injuries, and even the threat of lightning strikes on the greens. Yet it wasn’t any of these things that caused professional golfer Danielle Kang’s broken tooth on the opening day of the LPGA Singapore tournament.

“I was eating and it broke,” explained Kang. “My dentist told me, I've chipped another one before, and he said, you don't break it at that moment. It's been broken and it just chips off.” Fortunately, the winner of the 2017 Women’s PGA championship got immediate dental treatment, and went right back on the course to play a solid round, shooting 68.

Kang’s unlucky “chip shot” is far from a rare occurrence. In fact, chipped, fractured and broken teeth are among the most common dental injuries. The cause can be crunching too hard on a piece of ice or hard candy, a sudden accident or a blow to the face, or a tooth that’s weakened by decay or repetitive stress from a habit like nail biting. Feeling a broken tooth in your mouth can cause surprise and worry—but luckily, dentists have many ways of restoring the tooth’s appearance and function.

Exactly how a broken tooth is treated depends on how much of its structure is missing, and whether the soft tissue deep inside of it has been compromised. When a fracture exposes the tooth’s soft pulp it can easily become infected, which may lead to serious problems. In this situation, a root canal or extraction will likely be needed. This involves carefully removing the infected pulp tissue and disinfecting and sealing the “canals” (hollow spaces inside the tooth) to prevent further infection. The tooth can then be restored, often with a crown (cap) to replace the entire visible part. A timely root canal procedure can often save a tooth that would otherwise need to be extracted (removed).

For less serious chips, dental veneers may be an option. Made of durable and lifelike porcelain, veneers are translucent shells that go over the front surfaces of teeth. They can cover minor to moderate chips and cracks, and even correct size and spacing irregularities and discoloration. Veneers can be custom-made in a dental laboratory from a model of your teeth, and are cemented to teeth for a long-lasting and natural-looking restoration.

Minor chips can often be remedied via dental bonding. Here, layers of tooth-colored resin are applied to the surfaces being restored. The resin is shaped to fill in the missing structure and hardened by a special light. While not as long-lasting as other restoration methods, bonding is a relatively simple and inexpensive technique that can often be completed in just one office visit.

If you have questions about restoring chipped teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Veneers” and “Artistic Repair of Chipped Teeth With Composite Resin.”

By Gilbert Dental Care
December 10, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: teeth whitening  

Teeth Whitening ResultsWhere would you be without your smile? Keeping it bright and healthy pays big dividends in self-confidence and vibrant health. At Gilbert Dental Care in Philadelphia, PA, Dr. Steven Gilbert and Dr. Carlos Velez offer teeth whitening, one of the most sought-after cosmetic dental treatments available today. Learn how professional whitening keeps your valuable smile looking great.

What Is Teeth Whitening?

Teeth whitening from our Philadelphia office removes the stubborn stains from deep inside your tooth enamel where organic material sticks and hides. Dark beverages and foods, the aging process, and tobacco usage all dull and discolor the hard outer layer of your teeth. Simple brushing and flossing helps, but they cannot return your smile to the youthful, bright look it once had.

Additionally, over-the-counter whitening products such as toothpastes, strips, and rinses, somewhat help, but often leave teeth and gums uncomfortably sensitive. Gilbert Dental Care, on the other hand, presents patients with a better alternative: professional teeth whitening

Professional teeth whitening at your dentist's office uses a super-concentrated hydrogen peroxide gel to remove staining organic material from tooth surfaces. Available as a one-hour, in-office service, or as an at-home treatment, professional whitening improves tooth color by up to eight shades, and the results really last.

Is Whitening Right for You?

Your dentist allows patients without decay or gum disease to undergo whitening treatments. Whitening may also accompany other cosmetic services, such as bonding or veneers, to completely recreate your look. You and your dentist will agree as to what treatments are best for you, your busy schedule, and your budget.

If you want super-fast results, in-office whitening is the way to go. Your hygienist will protect your lips and tongue with a plastic damage, apply the gel, and allow it to penetrate your teeth. The gel will then be rinsed off and re-applied as necessary. In total. your whitening takes an hour, and you'll leave Gilbert Dental Care with a new smile.

At-home whitening takes about a week of daily applications via custom-made acrylic trays. The results are similar to the in-office variety, and both last indefinitely if you:

  • Brush twice a day according to American Dental Association (ADA) guidelines
  • Floss daily to eliminate plaque
  • See Dr. Gilbert or Dr. Velez twice a year for check-ups and hygienic cleanings
  • Reduce your intake of coffee, tea, and other staining foods
  • Stop smoking or chewing tobacco

Interested? Contact our Philadelphia Office Today!

You can say goodbye to dingy teeth when you come to Gilbert Dental Care for professional whitening. Call (215) 972-0406 today to explore the possibilities!